Category Archives: WUSA

Playoffs at the ‘Plex

Lori Lindsey holds off Marta, from a gameday program cover for the last team to have a women's professional soccer match at the 'Plex, the 2009 Washington Freedom.

Lori Lindsey holds off Marta, from a gameday program cover for the last team to have a women’s professional soccer playoff match at the ‘Plex, the 2009 Washington Freedom.

Based on what I’ve read on Twitter and elsewhere, Spirit fans have a definite glass-half-empty feeling about losing the first-place spot the last weekend of the season after having held it for several weeks previously. But look on the bright side: this is the best regular-season finish in the history of Washington women’s professional soccer.

Yes, Abby Wambach never managed it in four years here. Heck, Wambach and Mia Hamm combined never managed it. But this bunch of no-names – certainly with no one of the marquee value of the aforementioned – did the job.

However, though this Friday’s home playoff match is a first for the Spirit, it’s not a first for Washington (or the Soccerplex). Back in 2009, the Freedom finished third in Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) on the strength of a 4-1-1 finish to the season, which included a barnburner, 4-4 match against Sky Blue at Yurcak Field that the Freedom tied up in the final minutes off a goal from Cat Whitehill. (I got held up at halftime behind the stands chatting with someone at that match and got back late only to find that I’d missed not one but two goals.) It’s a team with a few players familiar to Spirit fans: Joanna Lohman, Lori Lindsey, and Ali Krieger were all on the roster.
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The WUSA Washington Freedom 15 Years On: Where are they now?

The 2003 championship team poses with the Founders Cup.

The 2003 championship team poses with the Founders Cup.

Fifteen years ago today the Washington Freedom hosted the first-ever women’s professional soccer match, taking on the Bay Area CyberRays at RFK Stadium. After my series earlier this year on the history of the Washington Freedom, I was asked if I could do a piece about where the players are now. Well, here you go – this seemed like an appropriate time to post. Thanks to Casey Zimny for some of this information.
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Lori Lindsey retires 12 years after turning professional

Someday there should be a DC Women's Soccer Hall of Fame, and Lori Lindsey should be in it

Someday there should be a DC Women’s Soccer Hall of Fame, and Lori Lindsey should be in it.


The Washington Freedom had a laudable tradition that I hope the Spirit eventually decide to emulate: they created a “Hall of Freedom”, an honor bestowed on former players and personnel “in recognition of exceptional achievements, dedication and service.” The first year’s honorees were the obvious ones: forward Mia Hamm, goalkeeper Siri Mullinix, midfielder (and later World Cup organizer) Steffi Jones, and the late David Vanole, goalkeeper coach during the WUSA era. Those were chosen by the staff. In 2010, they set up a voting process that involved fans, media, and staff, and defender Jennifer Grubb – who both captained or co-captained the team and played every single minute during the WUSA era – was elected the next inductee.

There was no 2011, of course, but the next thought is who should have been honored but wasn’t. First on the list would definitely be John and Maureen Hendricks, who helped establish both the WUSA and WPS and supported the Washington Freedom from 2001 through 2010. Next, in my opinion, would be coaches Jim Gabarra and Clyde Watson, who were part of the team through the entire WUSA era and most of the WPS era, and as well kept the team going during the lean years from 2004-2008 when there was no professional league to participate in.

Finally, there are people who have earned the honor but are still too active to be awarded it yet. (Gabarra might arguably fall into this category as well.) Abby Wambach is clearly in this category, having led or co-led the Freedom in scoring in every year they’ve played professionally. Louise Waxler – the operations manager for the Freedom for most of its existence – would also get my vote. The only other person who’s definitely earned the honor – again, in my opinion – is Lori Lindsey.
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SoloMemoir

Solo: A Memoir of Hope, by Hope Solo with Ann Killion.


(I actually read this last fall, but right before the news about the NWSL started getting hot and heavy. So I decided to hold off publishing it. Now that we’re in a bit of a preseason lull, I figured I’d go ahead and share it.)

First off, if you’re interested in this autobiography, make sure you don’t do what I did at first and end up requesting Hope Solo: My Story, which is the “young reader’s edition”, i.e., it has all the really juicy parts taken out. The prologue to that one is only two paragraphs long (ending in “Hope.” rather than going on to spend a couple of pages on the 2007 incident.) And the story of her mother getting back at the neighbors by putting up the fence they insisted on but putting a big yellow smiley face on it ends with “The smiley face wasn’t about happiness but a big protest against our neighbors.” instead of the original’s “The smiley face wasn’t a reflection of internal happiness. It was a big ‘f*** you’ to our neighbors.” [Asterisks mine.]

Second, let me be clear that I’m no fan of Hope Solo’s: she’s gone out of her way to insult and impugn friends of mine. I was actually mostly on her side back in 2007 (my personal opinion is that everything she said was absolutely true; the only problem was that she was the last person who should have been saying them), but since then she’s made several offensive statements.

That being said, this very frank autobiography went a long way toward increasing my sympathy for her. She had a tough life early: her father was a petty crook and con man who drifted in and out of her life – her mother got pregnant when she visited him in prison – and she had a feisty, conflicted relationship with the remaining relatives close to her like her mother and brother. Soccer was an escape and one she was very good at – though as a goal-scoring forward, not as the goalkeeper she eventually became.
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The Sermanni Dilemma: Where Does The USWNT Go From Here?

Tom Sermanni Courtesy U.S. Soccer

EAST HARTFORD, Conn. – For those who have been around long enough to remember the reference, the U.S. women’s soccer team trip through Connecticut had the feel of the old-school Ice Capades last week. You know, when the Olympic figure skating stars came back and tried to make some money (because they were still amateurs previously) by touring the country showing off their routines and signing autographs for screaming fans?

No one really cared how well they did, no one kept score, the people just wanted to see the Olympic stars in action.

There were obviously no triple axels from Alex Morgan – at least not that I saw – and cool costume choices were limited to both teams’ kits (the Where’s Waldos? against a minor league hockey team someone in the press box commented), but although some of the best players in the world were on the field, you had the distinct feel that competition was secondary as the game ended in a 2-2 draw.

As you can probably surmise already, I was torn. For someone who loves tactics and competition, both of which made the World Cup and Olympics an instant hit, I wasn’t going to get much of it here, which was frustrating when the top two teams in the world (at least according to the FIFA rankings) were below me.

But it’s not like I was a victim of false advertising or something, I was attending the “Nike Fan Tribute Tour, presented by Panasonic” for crying out loud. Abby Wambach had a goal (her 148th) and was all smiles afterward, even though the U.S. was generally outplayed (and outshot) and was forced to settle for a 2-2 tie, the first time since 2004 the USWNT failed to win in consecutive home games.

Wambach, like me, seemed a bit torn, mentioning that “this wasn’t our best soccer”, but quick to praise the nearly 20,000 people who braved a fairly hideous weather evening to see her and the U.S. play.  Morgan voiced similar sentiments, and you got the feeling she was a bit tired – mostly mentally – although she did have two assists. She sounded like an entertainer nearing the end of a long tour, but knowing that the people here deserved the same show that the people who came a month ago did.

And the fans that dodged the raindrops in Hartford cannot be discounted when discussing the overall dynamic here. Having lived here most of my life, I can tell you that Connecticut is not a great sports market, and the fact that 18,000+ showed up on a rainy, chilly Tuesday night is a testament to the popularity and success of Morgan, Wambach, and the U.S. machine.

Also, let’s be honest, most of them could care less about tactics, or whether interim coach Jill Ellis is integrating new players into the fold, or even the final score. As a youth coach, the talk at our practice the following day didn’t involve rising German star Dzenifer Marozsan, how the U.S. can stop her, or even why the U.S. doesn’t seem to have any players like her ready to join the USWNT in the near future, but how nice Abby Wambach was after the game, and who got whose autograph.

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Got A Case of the Mondays?

This should cheer you right up.

It was 2003. Remember when American Idol was still in its infancy, WUSA was still around, the 99’ers were still plying their trade and young Scotswoman Julie Fleeting was tearing it up in the U.S. of A? Neither do I. But thanks to WUSA ombudswoman Angie, here’s an awesome blast from the past.