Category Archives: Christine Sinclair

NWSL Week in Review: Concussions Are No Fun

It was 10 minutes into one of the final games of the high school season last fall, and our tall center back – perhaps the biggest key to anything we did in keeping from conceding goals – went up for a lofted ball into our box, something she does a few dozen times a game (in some cases in which we were outclassed, probably more).

She won the ball, per usual, but not cleanly. It caromed straight up in the air and was eventually kicked out of bounds. As I looked toward her, she was rooted in the same spot she headed the ball, blinking her eyes. A teammate went over to her, followed quickly by the referee, who waved me on. While she had never actually been knocked off her feet and could answer any question I threw at her, her pupils were clearly dilated and she said she had a little bit of a headache.

Because we were playing at a large school, the trainer had to be called from the volleyball game at the nearby school, which took about five minutes.

“It doesn’t look too bad, and I’ll leave it up to you, but I wouldn’t put her back in the game.”

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Sinclair suspended 4 games & fined $3,500 by FIFA

More than two months after the notorious Olympic semi-final match between Canada and the United States, FIFA is issuing a 4 game suspension and $3,500 fine to Christine Sinclair.

The 29-year-old CanWNT captain was sanctioned by the FIFA Disciplinary Committee for “displaying unsporting behaviour”. During post-match interviews for the 4-3 loss to the Americans, Sinclair questioned the refereeing of Norway’s Christiana Pedersen. Sinclair was quoted saying:

Obviously, we’re disappointed and upset. We felt that the referee took it away from us, so, yes, we are disappointed. We feel like we didn’t lose, we feel like it was taken from us. It’s a shame in a game like that, which is so important, that the ref decided the result before the game started.

Canada had been leading the semi-final 3-2 thanks to a Sinclair hattrick. In the 78th minute, Canadian goalkeeper Erin McLeod was whistled on an extremely rare 6-second rule. According to Pedersen, McLeod was taking longer than 6 seconds to release the ball upon this and previous goal kicks.

The resulting US free kick at the top of the box ricocheted off the arm of defender Marie-Eve Nault (some fans have argued that this instance was ball-to-arm, not arm-to-ball, i.e. unintentional). A penalty kick was subsequently awarded, which Abby Wambach buried to tie the match and force overtime.

A number of other questionable (non)calls were made during the match. Some fans would argue that Pedersen missed a PK for Canada when the ball struck the arm of US midfielder Megan Rapinoe in the second half. US goalkeeper Hope Solo, too, held the ball for more than 6-seconds on several occasions. Both squads were overtly physical, which should have warranted more cards being handed out to keep the match under control; Canada received the only 2 yellow cards issued. Canadian striker Melissa Tancredi appeared to have “stomped” on the head of Carli Lloyd, an allegation that Tancredi denies.

The US went on to win Olympic gold against Japan, while Canada took bronze over France.

The severity of Sinclair’s punishment is being compared relative to the 2-match ban of Colombia’s Lady Andrade, who punched Wambach in the face during an Olympic group match.

Sinclair is expected to address media on Monday regarding the suspension and fine.

Based on the FIFA Disciplinary Code tweeted by Jason deVos, since Canada is hosting the next Women’s World Cup and are not required to play in qualifying, Sinclair will serve the suspension during any upcoming friendlies.

As announced by the Canadian Soccer Association, “No further information will be available from the Canadian Soccer Association or media interviews granted on this decision until such time as those reasons for judgement are received and reviewed by the Canadian Soccer Association.”

In other news, the CanWNT are nominated for Yahoo! Canada’s The Big Buzz Awards for Big Buzz Story of the Year and Sinclair for Buzziest Canadian. Click here to vote. Also, the team will return to camp in December in Vancouver.

[Oct 15 update: The Canadian Soccer Association will pay for Sinclair’s $3,500 fine. She’ll serve her suspension when Canada competes at China’s Four Nation’s Tournament in January. However, if Canada makes an early exit from the tournament, then it’ll spill into the Cyprus Cup in March.

The punishment handed down by FIFA wasn’t for Sinclair’s post-match comments to media, but for comments she allegedly made directly to Pedersen immediately following the match. During Monday’s conference call, Sinclair said, “I’d like to acknowledge FIFA’s decision and it is my intent to accept it… As a player, you just want to move on as well as I want my team to move on.”]

Olympics – The All-Curren Team: Trying To Pick The Best 18 Not Easy

Well, here we are again, the end of another major women’s tournament, and time again for the AWK All-Curren Team. I call it that not out of a massive ego, but to indicate that it is indeed my choices and opinions. I point that out up front because for some reason choosing the best team from the Olympics was even tougher than the World Cup, even though there were fewer teams.

As with the World Cup, I sought to put together a real squad, one that could actually play (as opposed to starting nine forwards where we could score at will, but might end up playing Marta and Alex Morgan at outside back) a legitimate match.

And as always, feel free to put your choices in the Comments. Just remember, if you put someone in, someone has to come out and vice versa.

Among the players who barely missed the cut:

  • Portia Modise (South Africa), who had the goal of the tournament, and was very active in midfield for South Africa, who had their moments. Not enough moments for her to make the 18, though.
  • Renata Costa (Brazil) had a very good tournament defensively despite her team’s lack of organization.
  • Ali Riley and Ria Percival (New Zealand) might have cancelled each other out, as the entire New Zealand defense, including Jenny Bindon and Katie Hoyle, had a great tournament.
  • Two players who barely missed the cut at the World Cup did so again here in  Louisa Necib (France), who got off to a good start, but held the ball a little too long in some key spots for my taste, and Yukari Kinga (Japan), who was just edged out.
  • Lotta Schelin (Sweden), who probably suffered from a lack of support more than her failings.
  • And, perhaps the last cut, Yuki Ogimi (Japan), who scored three times in the tournament, including in the final, but in a tournament loaded with attacking players, we just couldn’t find a spot for her this time around. Next time.

So without further ado, here’s the squad:

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Olympics – What We Learned: U.S.-Canada – Sorry Canadians, But “Tuff S***”

SamuelLJackson: “Don’t know enuf about Soccer refs to know, but TV dude says he’s never SEEN that call made! Wow….we ll… TUFF S***!”

Yup, that’s what Samuel L. Jackson (indeed, that’s the same guy) sent to his 1,256,000 followers after the end of the U.S.-Canada game. I don’t know how much soccer Samuel has watched over the years (although we’ve seen him before), but in a game that is impossible to sum up in 1,400 words, let alone 140 characters, he did a pretty good job.

There is so much to talk about in this epic encounter that to spend too much time talking about a single referee’s decision will take away from how great this game (and this day) was for women’s soccer, but you have to start somewhere and we might as well get it out of the way.

In the 78th minute, Pia Sundhage and the U.S.,  trailing 3-2, had just played its trump card by substituting Sydney Leroux in for Amy LePeilbet and gone to a 3-4-3 formation. Megan Rapinoe put in a rare poor corner and Canadian goalkeeper Erin McLeod claimed it rather easily, falling to the ground as she did. She rose and was about to kick it quickly, then looked, saw her tired defense slow getting out, realized time was in her favor, took another couple of seconds, and punted the ball, as has been done thousands of times in last two decades (since the 6-step rule was changed to the 6-second rule for goalkeepers by FIFA) and likely hundreds of times at the Olympics.

We know what happened next. I don’t have a big problem with the ensuing penalty call that eventually allowed Abby Wambach to level the game, although common sense usually dictates that if you made one controversial call, you might let another questionable call against the same team go seconds later.

There are some that say that common sense has no place when we’re talking rules. They might be right. They might not.

But there is a rule that states that a goalkeeper must release the ball in six seconds. Not necessarily six seconds after they receive it (from the run of play), but – as it states here – six seconds after they are able to release it (as in not on the ground, how McLeod started). In watching the play again, I counted about eight legitimate seconds that McLeod had the ball.

So technically, she broke the rules, an indirect kick was correctly awarded and the U.S. eventually scored. There is no arguing that from here or anywhere, really.

However, to paraphrase Lieutenant Daniel Kaffee from A Few Good Men: “Yeah, but it wasn’t a real rule, was it? After all, it’s the Olympics. She wasn’t being asked to call a penalty or give out a red card. I mean, surely a referee of Christina Pedersen’s intelligence can be trusted to determine, on her own, which are the really important rules and which rules might, say, be morally questionable?”

If you know the movie, you know the response: “No she cannot.”

(Ironically, McLeod said after the game, she was warned, but “it wasn’t a real warning”. Really.)

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Olympics: Semifinal Preview – U.S.-Canada: One Small Switch, One Giant Leap for Canada

Perhaps one of my best coaching moves ever was a complete fluke, really. The summer months are technically a time for a break, but youth soccer takes few breaks these days, so of course a summer league was hastily organized. The games were glorified pickup, with a ref in the middle.

The parent organizers usually coach the teams so I went to watch one of my players to see how she was doing. Of course, parents always know what’s best in soccer coaching, so this dad thought his daughter (not the same player) was the best attacking midfielder and stuck her there accordingly, which was a little frustrating because I was hoping to see my player in her natural midfield position, the one she would play for my team.

The parent stuck my player at striker. Striker? Whatever. But then – keeping in mind my team had only managed 26 goals in 18 games the season before – a funny thing happened. She scored. Then she scored again. She finished with four goals the first game, a hat trick in another I watched.

Huh.

Six months later, she had the school single-season scoring record and the team erased just about every mark in the books on the way to its first league championship ever.

I’m sure John Herdman’s thought processes behind his tactical decisions are a little more complicated for Canada these days, but you never know. The Canadians were a team that I quite frankly thought was decent, but going to come up a little bit short at these Olympics after a somewhat disastrous 2011 World Cup. I went to Gillette Stadium to see Canada take on Brazil in March, and although Canada got a 2-1 win on two Christine Sinclair goals, my assessment on the Canadians was the same as I had since the World Cup (the Brazil stuff is a little telling, too), and probably all the way back to the 2007 World Cup, to be honest (although you may remember that the Canadians took the U.S. to extra time in the 2008 Olympics):

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Olympics – What We Learned: Quarterfinals – Great Britain 0:2 Canada

“We didn’t accomplish what we set out to,’’ observed Kelly Smith. “We’ve broken these records, inspired a lot of people but we didn’t get a medal. We fell short and all the players are hurting.”

In the ultimate reality show that is sport, the ending is not always assured. In fact, it’s very rarely assured. And until they start the Robotic Olympics (I expect about 2048 or so), the games are going to be played by humans, who have bodies that tend to break down. Kelly Smith’s body has been telling her for a while that the end of her playing career is near. She was able to get through three group stage games, leading Great Britain to an undefeated record, but just couldn’t go today, and the team wilted without her (and a lot of help from a resurgent Canada).

What was supposed to happen is that the country was supposed to continue to rally around Great Britain into the semifinals with the heavily favored United States. There was to be record crowds, record television audiences, and a chance to grow the women’s game in a place where it seemed to have a great place to do so. Instead, in front of a non-sell out in Coventry (although it was close), everything came to a screeching half.

Someone tell the writers of this show they’re terrible.

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Olympics – Quarterfinals Preview: Six Degrees Of Ali Riley

“Lately it occurs to me what a long, strange trip it’s been.”  – Grateful Dead

There might be someone on this planet that doesn’t like Ali Riley. Maybe she cut someone off in traffic somewhere once, and that person swears revenge. Maybe when she was playing at Stanford, she smiled a little too much and it rubbed someone the wrong way. But I’ve never talked to anyone who has a bad thing to say about Ali Riley. In fact, I’ve never talked with anyone who’s talked with anyone who’s been negative toward her.

Call it Six Degrees of lack of Ali Riley Negativity, I guess.

Riley grew up like any talented young soccer player in southern California, dreaming of playing on the biggest stage, which was within a stone’s throw of Riley’s home when Ali was just 11 and the United States beat China to win the World Cup in front of 90,000 people at the Rose Bowl in 1999. She continued up the youth ranks, good enough to get her a scholarship to Stanford, where she would eventually lead them to the national championship game in 2009.

Along the way, she got the attention of the national team, playing in the 2006 U-20 World Cup, and making her full international debut at a major tournament in Beijing two years later. Now a fixture with the national team, she might be its biggest star and with that comes all the publicity.

Of course, I’m not really fooling anyone reading this, am I? I mean, she has 60 caps for New Zealand by now, right?

Funny how life works.

When she was about to enter college, Ali’s dad John, a UCLA economics professor who grew up in New Zealand, decided to make a speculative phone call to people he knew in New Zealand to say his daughter might be able to help them if they wished. Riley had never been called into a youth national team here in the States, and by most accounts, had never really expected to. Making the U.S. national team is not as easy as it looks. Do the math of Division I college programs and quality clubs in the country and narrow it down to even a pool of a few dozen. Good luck.

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Olympics – Matchday 3: What We Learned – Canada 2:2 Sweden

Canada scored only one goal (a consolation tally in their first game) at the World Cup last year, and their offense hadn’t shown too many signs of being respectable, yet alone explosive since John Herdman took over the helm from Carolina Morace last year. So the key at the Olympics was clearly scoring goals, their defense should be able to keep people in check if they could only find someone to help out Christine Sinclair.

Strike that, reverse it.

There are still many questions to be answered about the Canadians, but after a spirited 2-2 comeback against Sweden, one thing you can say for certain. It’s better than where they were last summer.

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Olympics – Matchday 2: What We Learned – Canada 3:0 South Africa

Canada, with plenty on the line after last year’s World Cup failures, got an early goal from Melissa Tancredi, and was able to breathe easy for a while, but South Africa made things difficult for a long time, including late in the first half allowed Banyana Banyana to hit the crossbar. As South Africa tired, Christine Sinclair brought order to the proceedings and eventually Canada had a relatively comfortable 3-0 win. Canada still has questions, but the mission for the day was to put themselves in position to advance, and unless they get blown out by Sweden, they should live to see the quarterfinals. Mission accomplished.

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Olympic Preview And Predictions: Has It Been That Long Since Japan’s Win Already?

Was it already more than a year ago that we watched in delight as the United States women’s soccer team pulled off a comeback for the ages against Brazil, and then in horror as Japan did the same just a week later to capture an unexpected (and its first) World Cup.

Of course, it’s a little hard to be horrified when speaking of Japan, what a great story and a class act in a country that was not far removed from a devastating tsunami.

For whatever reason, the United States has continued to just about own the Olympic tournament, even if they haven’t won a World Cup since 1999, the U.S. has won every gold medal but one (2000) the Olympics have had to offer, posting a dominant 18-2-3 all-time mark.

Both losses at the Olympics came to Norway, including the opener of the 2008 Games in Beijing, but the Norwegians are nowhere to be found in Britain, and they’re not alone. The entertaining cast of 16 characters we had last summer in Germany has been cut to 12 for London (of course, most soccer matches won’t be in London, but I digress), and sadly we’ll be missing the Germans themselves, the aforementioned Norwegians, up-and-coming Australia, and African sides Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea, neither of whom embarrassed themselves in Germany (Nigeria, especially, they beat Canada, and gave France fits).

But even without those teams, when it comes to the medal rounds, there are plenty of nominees to dethrone the Americans, starting with World Champion Japan. If you’re like me, you forgot (at least a little), but the Japanese were beginning to knock on the door way back in China four years ago. A new coach named Norio Sasaki had them playing decent soccer, but they were derailed twice by those darn Americans, 1-0 in the group stage and 4-2 in the semifinals after grabbing an early lead (Japan also played the U.S. tough in the 2004 quarterfinals, losing 2-1 on an Abby Wambach goal).

Then, of course, there are the French, who on paper, might be the favorites, running roughshod over just about everyone (including Japan) in friendlies, and seemingly just getting better since last summer, where they were pretty darn good. They haven’t knocked off the United States yet, but that didn’t stop Japan last year, did it?

Those seem to be the three heavy favorites. Great Britain, as the hosts, could be a factor, but I find it somewhat amazing that countries scour the world for players that will be eligible to play for them, and then Scotland and England can barely get along to combine to make a team for the Olympics, for crying out loud. But I don’t live there, so who am I to talk?

Sweden can’t be counted out, Brazil has Marta, and Canada has Christine Sinclair. So, really, if all goes according to plan, the entire knockout stage will be to eliminate one of: New Zealand, Cameroon, Colombia, South Africa, or North Korea.

So much for drama there, huh?

But I’ve been invited (as far as you know) back to the AWK Summer Timeshare, so here I am. The place looks a little different, but I’m happy to be here. Coverage will be a little tougher at the Olympics than it was at the World Cup. As Hope Solo has told us (and some others), there is plenty of other action going on around England, which means that all 12 teams will play on the same day in all three group match days. But we’ll do our best.

And have fun doing it.

A few times after the completion of games of the recent men’s Euros, Michael Cox of the fantastic Zonal Marking website simply said, “Small margins.” Like Spain beating Portugal in penalty kicks, for instance. With the real start of the tournament not until the quarterfinals, a team getting some breaks for three straight games may be able to beat the odds and take home an unlikely gold medal. But, as the Spain men have proven repeatedly, maybe not.

Here are my quick predictions:

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