NWSL – 2017 NWSL Draft – Chris’ Big Board #51 to 75

51. Madison Tiernan – F (CF), MF (AMC) – Rutgers

What I Said Before 2016:

A bit of a mixed bag as a prospect, as Tiernan’s never really developed into a top level forward after some promising performances as a rookie for the Scarlet Knights. Tiernan was already one of the AAC’s top attackers as a rookie before Rutgers moved into the Big Ten, scoring six goals for the club and then repeating the feat a season later, setting up hopes for a junior season that would help her club to bigger and better things. The Scarlet Knights got there, of course, but few could probably argue that Tiernan had a big hand in it after slumping to a mystifying two goals on a whopping sixty-three shots. She’ll probably get a look, as inevitably all Rutgers players do with Sky Blue FC in close proximity, but a big rebound season as a senior may be necessary for Tiernan to move back up the board.

Anything New?

Well, Tiernan kept shooting in 2016, but this time, she actually put up some tangible results, netting a career high eleven goals while also assisting on six goals, also a career best. Tiernan’s efficiency continues to be a serious issue, with the Rutgers forward needing nine shots per goal while putting less than 50% of her efforts on frame. But when Tiernan did find the back of the net, she did it against some big time opposition, including UConn, Georgetown, and Penn State. This is a crowded class of forwards though, meaning Tiernan may need to make it through the camp invite route.

52. Tabby Tindell – F – Florida Gulf Coast

What I Said Before 2016:

Florida Gulf Coast’s been formidable for a while in DI, but they’ve only truly hit a new level since the rise of Tindell, who has been a scoring terror for the Eagles the past three seasons. Fifteen goals as a freshman was a marvelous debut for Tindell, and she’s promptly followed it up with thirty-seven combined goals in the two following seasons, including seventeen last year to go with ten assists. Tindell’s proven to be solid efficiency-wise, with five shots per non-penalty goal last season while putting an absurd 67.5% of shots on frame. The big question is if the Eagles forward can do it consistently against top level teams. The evidence from last year doesn’t exactly speak in her favor.  It could potentially be a case of needing to flourish in an environment surrounded by pro level players, but if Tindell can’t find her scoring touch against top teams as a senior, she might not make it above late-round flyer status.

Anything New?

Tindell’s goal total dipped slightly to fourteen as a senior, but she was still the class of the field in the A-Sun and at one point scored in ten straight matches in the middle of the season. But she struggled down the stretch, with just one goal in FGCU’s final five matches and was held without a shot on goal in the finale against Florida. Tindell did a little better against bigger opposition than in past seasons, but she didn’t have the huge performance against a top team that would’ve put her name in lights. In a very tough class, Tindell’s going to be a late round find or hopeful camp invitee.

53. Emily Armstrong – GK – UConn

What I Said Before 2016:

Armstrong might be the one who got away for Boston College, who had the keeper on their books in 2012 but did not use her, with the netminder transferring to regional rival UConn right after that season and has been a revelation in goal for the Huskies ever since. Armstrong really had a star turn in the 2014 AAC Tournament, where she was a rock in goal, helping the Huskies to silverware with a strong display in goal in the competition. She didn’t look back as a junior, winning league Goalkeeper of the Year honors after another fantastic season between the pipes for the Huskies. Usually working with a very secure set of hands, Armstrong is still capable of making acrobatic saves and has a rocket for a leg, especially on punts. The Husky keeper still could get a bit better in the air for someone her size, but the upside is definitely there.

Anything New?

Armstrong excelled again on a UConn side that just overpowered almost all of its league rivals, but the lack of a deep NCAA Tournament run could stifle her profile a bit heading into the draft. When I saw her live against Cincinnati, Armstrong seemed to struggle a bit in traffic, which adds to the concerns in the air stated above. Still, Armstrong’s an A-level shot stopper that isn’t afraid to play on the edge. She’s not an elite prospect, but Armstrong is probably worth a long look at the very least.

54. Serina Kashimoto – D/MF – Butler

What I Said Before 2016:

You probably are familiar with Kashimoto’s story by this point. The former captain of the Japan U17 team, Kashimoto worked diligently to get eligible in DI and ended up at Butler of all places, helping the Bulldogs to their stirring run to the Big East Tournament title last year. The Japanese youth international took a little while to settle in at this level but has since turned into one of the region’s best midfielders and undoubtedly one of the best to ever pull on a shirt for Butler. Standing at just 5’3”, Kashimoto played center-back for Japan but was used in a more offensive role for the Bulldogs, no doubt due to her technical proficiency. A wizard with the ball at her feet in tight spaces, Kashimoto has made overmatched defenders look silly with her close control for three years. She’s also a great distributor, including from out wide and on set pieces, meaning a role as a full-back or winger isn’t out of the question. Kashimoto doesn’t possess A-level athleticism though, and when the game got sped up against some of Butler’s better opponents, she receded into the background a bit.

Anything New?

With Butler needing an offensive spark in 2016, Kashimoto took on a more advanced role for the club and scored nine goals and added seven assists to finish out her acclaimed career with the Bulldogs. Her weaknesses are still there though, and her offensive pace slowed markedly against Big East opponents. It’s unlikely she’ll make her mark on these shores, but she should have a solid career somewhere overseas, perhaps back in Japan.

55. Crystal Thomas – F – Georgetown

New Profile!

It took a while for Thomas to truly live up to her potential, but the Hoya forward did so in style as a senior in 2016. A one-time freshman phenom at Notre Dame, Thomas would endure a rocky middle portion of her career, seeing her numbers dip as a sophomore while missing almost all of 2014 through injury after transferring to the Hoyas. But Thomas eased back into form in 2015 before netting an impressive eleven goals as a fifth-year senior for the Hoyas in their run to the College Cup. It was an interesting turn for Thomas, as she was the club’s super sub, starting just one match but turning into the perfect weapon to run at tired legs in the waning minutes of halves. Thomas did a lot of mop-up work against weak opposition, but she’s also capable of scoring some outrageous goals, such as the winner against Santa Clara in the Elite Eight. An Eclipse Select product, Thomas has the potential to be another late-round steal for the Red Stars.

56. Hayley Dowd – F – Boston College

What I Said Before 2016:

Dowd is just the latest attacking threat from the conveyor belt in Newton that churns out scorers at a frequent rate. With plenty of attackers already on the roster when Dowd as a freshman, she had to be content with super sub status before really breaking out in 2014 as a starter. As a part of BC’s high-octane offense (and with Meehan injured), Dowd went on a scoring frenzy, netting fifteen goals to lead the club and put down a marker for herself as one of the nation’s most dangerous forwards. The question going into 2015 was how well Dowd would be able to co-exist with Meehan healthy again. The answer? Pretty well, even if her numbers declined a bit. Dowd scored four goals against RPI Top 50 teams and seven against Top 100 teams, including goals against ACC powerhouses Duke, Florida State, and Virginia. But she’s also an inefficient scorer, with a 35.1% SOG percentage especially troubling. Scorers are a dime-a-dozen in this class, so Dowd may need to round off some of the rough edges in her game to ensure herself of hearing her name called in January.

Anything New?

Dowd’s stock has largely plunged over the last year, as she saw her scoring total decline for the second straight season, with just seven goals during the 2016 campaign for a disappointing BC side. She was incredibly inconsistent as a senior, scoring against the likes of Duke and Florida State but also netting just once in her final eight matches. Add that to worrisome efficiency numbers, and it’s easy to be wary of the Eagle forward going into this draft.

57. Emma Fletcher – MF – Cal

What I Said Before 2016:

Has experience at youth international level for both New Zealand (at the U17 level) and Canada (at the U20 level). A highly coveted youth prospect, Fletcher began her college career on the other side of the continent with LSU and set the SEC on fire as a freshman. A starter from day one, Fletcher racked up twelve assists and became an instant sensation for the Tigers’ internationally tinged contingent. It didn’t particularly end all that well for Fletcher in Baton Rouge though, as she appeared jaded upon her return from Canada’s less than spectacular U20 World Cup in 2014, and it was hardly a surprise that she was out the door at season’s end, transferring to Pac-12 contenders Cal before her junior season. Without as much pressure to produce on the stat sheet given the superior talent surrounding her, Fletcher was able to be a steadier presence in the center of the park, even if she only had three assists. But considering her international status, Fletcher may need to be more dynamic as a senior if she’s to avoid the fate of many previous very good but not great Canadians come draft day.

Anything New?

2016 was a pivotal season for Fletcher to prove she’s worth an allocation spot or international slot for an NWSL team, and the Canadian didn’t really provide much evidence for the affirmative. Cal didn’t really have any great breakthrough this past season despite still being solid, while Fletcher just couldn’t find the extra gear people have been looking for for the past few years. She was an absolute black hole of efficiency, taking an eye-watering sixty-one shots and scoring just once while only adding four assists. Potential is still here, but it’s increasingly likely Fletcher will be honing that potential overseas.

58. Sarah Teegarden – MF (DMC, MC) – Wake Forest

New Profile!

Late riser has been an iron woman who has toiled away on some pretty poor Wake Forest teams throughout a quietly effective college career. It wasn’t probably the way Teegarden had envisioned things would go after making an immediate impression as a rookie back in 2013, but the Californian would have to wait until this past season to get true recognition as one of the nation’s most underrated midfielders. A water carrier in the middle of the park, Teegarden proved an effective ball winner, whether it was sliding in for crunching tackles or asserting aerial dominance in the middle of the park. Also capable of spraying long diagonal balls to the flanks, Teegarden could be an effective piece for a team with some actual firepower. Simple, possession winning midfielders are a rarity these days with so much focus on playmakers and scorers in the middle of the park, but Teegarden could fill a role nicely if given a chance.

59. Katie Johnson – F – USC

New Profile!

Just as Amy Rodriguez’s name will be forever tied to her College Cup performances in USC’s first title win in 2007, Katie Johnson will forever live in Trojan lore after her exploits almost a decade later in 2016. It was quite the unlikely story considering Johnson had missed all of 2015 through injury after a solid three-year career with the Trojans before then. But few likely expected a big breakthrough as a fifth-year senior after Johnson had scored just fourteen goals in three years combined before missing 2015. However, Johnson hit double figures as a senior, shining brightest with a goal and an assist against North Carolina in the regular season before netting the only goal against Georgetown and two against West Virginia in the College Cup final. While Johnson proved she can score against the biggest clubs in the biggest moments, she was a bit streaky during the season, enduring a nine game run without a goal heading into the final weekend along with boasting middling efficiency numbers. Johnson might get a long look based on that final two game showing though, and few would argue she doesn’t deserve one after those heroics.

60. Jenna Hellstrom – F (CF) – Kent State

What I Said Before 2016:

Canadian hadn’t really made a dent on the national radar coming into Kent State, having only been with the youth international team up to U15 level but has promptly turned into one of the nation’s most dangerous mid-major forwards over the past three seasons with the Golden Flashes. Hellstrom didn’t strike it big as a rookie but still showed enough to win MAC Freshman of the Year honors and promptly backed the honor up the next season with seven goals and six assists for KSU as their leading scoring option. That would be just the prologue to a true breakout season as a junior, where Hellstrom hit double figures in goals and assists, scoring eleven times and assisting on twelve more goals. Canadian nationality will make it almost impossible to stick in the NWSL, but Hellstrom could still find a nice home for her talents in Europe.

Anything New?

Kent State had a marvelous 2016 season, and Hellstrom’s efforts in front of goal were a major reason for that. The Canadian went on a tear during the first half of the season, at one point logging a goal or an assist in ten straight matches for the Golden Flashes. Hellstrom would cool down a bit in the last half of the season but still finished with a career best fourteen goals to go with ten assists. Though her efficiency rate is decent, the main question is if Hellstrom can boost her game against top opponents. In a crowded field, Hellstrom might be bound for Europe, where her scoring talent could be in demand.

61. Allison Wetherington – MF (RM, AMC) – Portland

What I Said Before 2016:

It’s not quite gone to plan for either Wetherington or her Portland side, who have both slipped from prominence in quite a precipitous fashion over the past three seasons. Wetherington entered the college ranks as one of her class’ prized recruits and a player expected to help keep the Pilots on top of the WCC and another potential pro churned out from a very active pipeline in Portland. However, Wetherington has merely been good for the Pilots. A former WCC Freshman of the Year, Wetherington was still excellent as a sophomore but seems to be spinning her wheels at the moment and may have even regressed after just an above average 2015. She still produced on the stat sheet with three goals and five assists, but it was hardly the breakthrough season needed or expected for the Pilots. A pure wide midfield candidate at the next level, Wetherington faces a crucial season as a senior for Portland.

Anything New?

It just never really came together for Wetherington at this level. The former prized recruit was still one of the shining lights on a mediocre Portland team, but her inability to help boost the Pilots back into the WCC’s upper echelon doesn’t help her case, even if the talent drain out of Portland has been noticeable. She’ll probably get a look in someone’s camp, but it’s hard seeing someone springing for her in a loaded draft.

62. Lorina White – D (CB) – Ball State

What I Said Before 2016:

White is one of the very rare examples of a junior college star whose stock has kept rising after making the transition to Division I. 2014’s JUCO Player of the Year at powerhouse Monroe College, few likely knew what to expect White once she stepped up to this level with Ball State. They needn’t have worried, as White made an immediate impact, helping to turn BSU’s defense into one of the region’s best and leading the Cardinals to a MAC title. White picked up some more individual hardware after last season, being named as the MAC Defensive Player of the Year, the first ever major individual honor for a Cardinal player. The stellar junior campaign shows that White hasn’t peaked yet and that she won’t wilt against DI opposition, which gives her a glimmer of hope in catching on at the next level. Keeping BSU going this year will be key to getting noticed though, an especially important point considering White’s not the biggest central defender size-wise.

Anything New?

Rinse and repeat for White, who had a second great season in a row as the anchor of the BSU backline, winning MAC Defensive Player of the Year honors for the second year running. White added three goals as well and can stake a claim as being one of the best JUCO transfers at DI level in the past decade given her performance and the impact it had on the Ball State program. In a class that could be struggling for depth in defense a bit, White might be a sleeper to keep an eye on in later rounds.

63. Summer Clarke – F (CF) – LSU

What I Said Before 2016:

Clarke may have gotten back into the Canadian WNT’s good graces after a rocky relationship in the past, but I’m not particularly sold on the LSU forward. Clarke made a big impression as a rookie, scoring ten goals for the Tigers but doing it against the dregs of LSU’s schedule for the most part and has struggled to take the next step towards stardom. What’s followed has been two seven goal seasons where Clarke has faded as the weather’s turned frosty, including a junior season that started with a ton of potential, the Canadian scoring her seven goals in the club’s first ten matches. But Clarke then proceeded to not score in LSU’s last thirteen matches and only had four shots on goal in that span, perhaps making her All-SEC second team honors a bit of a mystery. Being hobbled by injury that cost Clarke three games late in the season didn’t help her cause either. Impressing on her senior WNT debut in the offseason should be a confidence booster, but it’s difficult seeing her allocated anywhere in the NWSL by Canada if she can’t make a quantum leap in production.

Anything New?

Based off her 2016 season, teams shouldn’t go anywhere near Clarke. Needing a big season to rise up the draft boards, Clarke threw up an absolute stinker, scoring just three goals and adding three assists. Clarke scoring against the likes of South Carolina and Auburn shows there’s talent there, but Clarke also didn’t even post a shot on goal in *ten* matches for LSU in 2016. Some squad might hope Clarke is a late bloomer and just needs to be around better players to flourish, but it’s difficult seeing any NWSL team think the Canadian is worth the trouble at the moment.

64. Paige Lombard – D – Penn

New Profile!

A testament to perseverance, Lombard is the rare case of a fifth-year senior at an Ivy League school. Lombard began her career promisingly at the University of Miami despite an ACL tear early in her true freshman season in 2012 but decided to transfer up to Penn after upheaval in management in Coral Gables and has turned into a stalwart Ivy League defender. Lombard would suffer another ACL injury that cost her 2014, but she rebounded to put up two fantastic years for the Quakers as an important veteran presence on the backline for the Ivy League side. Lombard’s injury history is obviously a big concern, but it might be the only thing separating her from being a great late-round sleeper. With the lack of depth in defense in this class, she could stick in the right situation.

65. Carol Rodrigues – F – UCF

What I Said Before 2016:

Brazilian is perhaps most well known for her bicycle kick against Tulsa last season that drew attention from national highlight shows. Former youth international is the rare player to make a successful step up from the junior college ranks to a major conference program, giving UCF a serious attacking threat in 2015 after two productive seasons with Monroe Junior College. Any questions over Rodrigues’ ability to make the step up to DI proper were answered positively, as the Brazilian started every match and was AAC co-Offensive Player of the Year with eleven goals and six assists. Rodrigues’ shots per goal numbers are solid, though her SOG % of just 47.2% could use some improvement. With nine goals against RPI Top 100 teams, Rodrigues also has the power to be a factor against this division’s top teams as well. Why isn’t she higher? Because there might be some questions over her ability to handle the pace of the professional game. The Brazilian certainly knows what to do with the ball when she gets it within sight of goal, but she’s also a bit plodding going forward.

Anything New?

Rodrigues played well in 2016 but didn’t really do much to distinguish herself as someone worth spending an international slot on as a rookie. Her twelve goals were pretty deceiving, as most of them came against vastly inferior opposition, with the Brazilian being shutout by top teams like North Carolina, Duke, South Carolina, and Florida throughout the year. She’ll probably have suitors abroad but is probably out of luck in this class in the NWSL.

66. Savannah Levin – D (FB) – USC

New Profile!

The unheralded member of USC’s all-star defense, Levin stepped into the Pac-12 with mighty shoes to fill as the younger sister of Stanford legend and current Orlando Pride player Camille Levin. The younger Levin isn’t quite of that calibre but proved to be a dependable full-back for the Trojans through three years, starting most of the time in her sophomore and junior seasons. But Levin would truly shine as a senior as one of the key cogs of the back four that helped lead USC to a national title. The full-back was more than a little involved in the attack, tying for second in the team with five assists while also knocking in a couple of goals. How Levin defends pro level talent is a question though, as she struggled in the final against West Virginia’s dynamic attack. At the very least though, Levin should get a shot to show she belongs in someone’s camp this preseason.

67. Toriana Patterson – D (CB) – UConn

New Profile!

Former Jamaican youth international has enjoyed a great comeback after two lost years two begin her college career at the University of Georgia. While Patterson would take a while to find her feet at UConn, she’s been an invaluable rock at the back for the Huskies as they’ve returned to national contention the past two seasons. The reigning AAC Co-Defensive Player of the Year, Patterson is a tenacious 1v1 defender willing to slide in for tackles while also being formidable in the air. Pace at the next level is a serious question though, as Patterson could struggle to contain quicker forwards in the pros. I doubt the New York native will be a superstar as a professional, but her last few college seasons should ensure she at least gets a look.

68. Melanie Donaldson – MF (CM) – Missouri

What I Said Before 2016:

Unsung heroine playing in an unglamorous defensive midfield role for the Tigers over the course of the past three seasons. Has been ever-present as a starter in the middle of the park for Missouri in all three seasons, starting almost every match for the SEC side. Not just a defensive mauler, as she’s tallied six goals and four assists over the course of the past three seasons, and the Missouri native doesn’t lack for a quick trigger in the middle of the park either. Arguably had her best season in 2015 as a junior, and if that arc continues to go upward in her final year in Columbia, Donaldson could sneak onto the radar as a later round pick or as a preferred undrafted free agent for an NWSL side. Doesn’t have ideal size for a defensive midfielder at the next level at just 5’5”, though that’s not a deal breaker in all likelihood. Biggest question perhaps is if Donaldson can be dynamic enough to make an impact at the professional level.

Anything New?

Not particularly. As a senior, Donaldson was a very good player on an above average Missouri side, which neither helps nor hurts her profile going into this draft. She chipped in with her usual couple of goals while probably taking too many shots considering her limitations. There are a lot of dynamic midfielders in front of her in the pecking order, but if she gets a shot, she might stick as a “glue” player in the middle of the park somewhere.

69. Addie Steiner – F – Hawaii

New Profile!

Steiner represents one of the odder stories in recent seasons in collegiate ball. A solidly decorated forward at Northwestern for three years, Steiner looked like one of the Big Ten’s best forwards after a 2015 season that had seen her score seven goals and add seven assists for the Wildcats. But then came the rather puzzling news that Steiner had transferred out to Hawaii for her senior season despite what appeared to be no ties to the islands, as the forward is originally from the Midwest. While Steiner did just fine for the Rainbow Wahine, she perhaps didn’t dominate competition to the full extent expected when she transferred, scoring eight goals but netting all but one of those in a six match span midseason against shallow competition. Undersized at 5’2”, Steiner should still draw some attention from Midwestern sides FC Kansas City and Chicago.

70. Kaitlyn Johnson – F (CF), MF – Washington State

What I Said Before 2016:

Likely the leading conduit of offense on a traditionally goal shy Washington State side. Johnson hadn’t shown much in front of goal going into the 2015 season, having netted just once as a rookie and then three times one season later in 2014. Johnson’s junior season was a big one though, as she scored seven times and added six assists, both tops on the WSU squad. It’s hard to quibble with Johnson’s efficiency numbers, but closer inspection of her scoring record shows that she did at times struggle to make an impression against the likes of USC, Cal, and Northwestern. Johnson did score against Cal State Fullerton and Washington, so the ability is there, but the consistency needs a bit of fine tuning going into her senior season here. A center-forward in WSU’s 4-2-2-2 system, it’s unlikely Johnson is big enough at 5’3” to fulfill the same role in a pro system. Faces intense competition at forward in this class, so hitting double digits in goals as a senior could be key to draft status.

Anything New?

It was a pretty forgettable season for both Johnson and her club in 2016. She appeared to be set for big things after scoring against BYU in the opener and then racking up four assists against North Dakota State a few weeks later, but there was little to shout about for the rest of the year. Three goals and six assists (with four coming against NDSU) isn’t going to get many players noticed, especially in this top heavy class of attackers. Johnson showed the versatility to play in midfield and attack, and that might be key to sticking in camp for someone.

71. Abby Reed – F (RF) – DePaul

What I Said Before 2016:

It’s been a roller coaster ride for Reed, who began her college career as a star with Indiana State in the rather demure Missouri Valley Conference, always looking like the proverbial big fish in the small pond. A transfer to DePaul appeared to answer many questions about Reed’s true quality, as she had a fantastic first season for the Blue Demons as they had a year to remember. But DePaul leaned more on Elise Wyatt for goals last season, and the club and Reed so their fortunes sink a bit in 2015. After twenty-two combined goals in her first two collegiate seasons, Reed sank to just five goals last year despite taking a similar number of shots as she had the prior two years, with most of those goals coming against the bottom of the barrel in terms of DePaul’s opponents. With Wyatt graduated, Reed could bounce back up this list if she can shoulder the scoring burden in 2016.

Anything New?

Reed took top billing once again in the offense after playing a sidekick role in 2015 as DePaul improved markedly this past season. As a result, the senior’s goals total more than doubled, as Reed netted eleven on the season, including a stretch of goals in five straight matches in midseason to go along with crunch goals against Georgetown and Marquette in late October. Though she proved she can score against big clubs, Reed’s efficiency also dipped a bit, as she needed more than six shots to score her goals in 2016. Regardless, Reed should provide some competition on the wing in camp for someone this season.

72. Taylor Schissler – D – DePaul

New Profile!

Like her teammate above Abby Reed, Schissler ended up being an astute addition via transfer for DePaul. Unlike Reed, Schissler didn’t really show signs of being a star at this level before coming to Chicago. While Schissler was a solid spot starter and valued reserve at Ohio State, she wasn’t extraordinary, but upon transferring to DePaul, the Illinois native became a key defender for the Blue Demons for two seasons. Besides anchoring the defense for DePaul, Schissler had a shockingly great season in front of goal, netting six goals and leading the team in assists with seven, both great totals for a defender. While it’s unlikely Schissler will be that sharp in front of goal at the next level, her stellar play the past two seasons could put her on some NWSL radars.

73. Jacqueline Altschuld – MF/D – San Diego

What I Said Before 2016:

Consistently a standout for a San Diego program that’s been a bit erratic in form during her three years with the club thus far. The versatile Altschuld has shown herself to be capable in both midfield and on the backline, where she made a big impact as a rookie, helping buttress the Toreros defense as one of the league’s most promising young defenders. Since, Altschuld’s been a bit more involved on the other side of the ball, with her offensive efforts helping San Diego into the NCAA Tournament as a sophomore. However, Altschuld’s stock probably slipped along with the Toreros’ last season, as USD struggled mightily in the WCC. Altschuld actually led the team in shots and in assists with seven in the latter category, but that may speak more to USD’s general lack of attacking weapons more than anything else. Her past performance will likely keep Altschuld in the draft discussion regardless, but a rebound season for San Diego would probably help her cause greatly.

Anything New?

Altschuld kind of treaded water on a San Diego team that did much of the same in 2016. The utility player still loves her stepovers and still is fine delivering set pieces, but being stuck on a USD team that hasn’t been up to much in the past few seasons may have stunted her growth. She’s still a fun player to watch in breaking defenses down 1v1 and even has a little burst to work into space, so she may benefit greatly from playing around pro level players. If Altschuld doesn’t cut it in the NWSL, she might have a solid future abroad given her technical and creative skill.

74. Carly Gould – MF – Brown

New Profile!

A major catalyst for the resurgence of a once laggard Brown program, Gould has essentially been a four year starter for the Bears but only really began to grow into her potential as an upperclassman. That included a burst of goals as a junior and senior, with Gould netting seven in 2015 before scoring four as a senior in a season in which she was named All-Ivy First Team unanimously. Gould does her best work in front of goal from short range as an aerial target on set pieces or cleaning up rebounds and probably isn’t going to match her college scoring pace at the next level. Needs to show she has an extra gear athletically to stick in the pros but size makes her an interesting candidate to switch to a more defensive midfield role or perhaps into central defense.

75. Tarah Hobbs – GK – Minnesota

What I Said Before 2016:

An A-level shot stopper, Hobbs is a keeper who burst onto the college landscape with an electrifying rookie season in 2013 but who, perhaps, has not developed as once expected after that superlative first season with the Golden Gophers. Hobbs was kept busy as a rookie for Minnesota, making one hundred twenty-two saves and winning league Goalkeeper of the Year honors as a freshman. Thankfully, Hobbs’ workload has dropped since then as her defense has gotten better, but the Minnesota keeper hasn’t quite matched that freshman season. Hobbs is probably one of this goalkeeper class’ best athletes, but she tends to be a bit erratic with the finer points in goal at times. None of which can’t be helped with good coaching at the next level though, and Hobbs probably fits the profile of a keeper that at least gets a look somewhere in somebody’s camp next preseason.

Anything New?

Hobbs and Minnesota had a great season in 2016, winning both legs of the Big Ten double, though they bowed out disappointingly early in the NCAA Tournament. While Hobbs probably hasn’t hit the heights expected of her early on in her career, she’s still proven to be a formidable goalkeeper at college level. Her athleticism gives her a shot at sticking as a developmental option with good coaching, but it might be in her best interests to hone her craft with steady minutes abroad, especially in a packed goalkeeping class.

One thought on “NWSL – 2017 NWSL Draft – Chris’ Big Board #51 to 75

  1. js

    No love for Rylee Baisden? Too many keepers in this list… never before have more than 5 gone in a draft and I don’t figure that there will be that many this year either

    Reply

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