Memorable Result: USWNT/Dominican Republic Report, Quotes and Video

By Gavin Day

 

The onslaught started just 38 seconds in and didn’t let up for the rest of the 90 minutes as the United States came out flying and flattened their ill-fated opponents. Abby Wambach got that first goal and one other as the U.S. began its qualification campaign for the 2012 Olympics with a 14-0 drubbing over the Dominican Republic.

Carli Lloyd netted the team’s second just moments before the four minute mark. A U.S. cross missed everyone and came back off the post and Lloyd was there to tuck in from close range before Rachel Buehler converted off a Lauren Cheney corner kick.

After the third, the Americans were forced to wait for their fourth, but not for long. Heather O’Reilly was played through on the right side and she scored to make it four in the 17th minute and Wambach added another just two minutes later.

“Soccer is an amazing sport and there’s all different levels of competition all around the world. Obviously the score makes people feel like it wasn’t even a competition,” explained Wambach. “We, as a team, feel like we have so many things we need to work on. This was a game that gave us the opportunity to work on some things.”

Tobin Heath got the U.S. back on the score sheet on the half hour mark. Heath nicely controlled a chip pass from O’Reilly and had acres of space to put the ball away.

O’Reilly then started and then finished a give-and-go move not even a minute later. She got her second after feeding a pass to Cheney before receiving the through ball on the right side.

“This is the best team I’ve had since 2008,” said U.S. coach Pia Sundhage, who drew some criticism for continuing to overly celebrate American goals, even when the Americans were over the double-digit mark.

With precisely one minute on the clock in the second half, Amy Rodriguez, who came on at the half, tapped in a Cheney cross from close range and the Americans were off once again.

Just minutes later Rodriguez scored another cross from Cheney, this time from the left, and with not even five minutes into the second half, the U.S. broke the record for the most goals in a final round Olympic qualifying game with their ninth.

Rodriguez completed her hat-trick in the 59th minute to make it three goals in 13 minutes for the forward. More than anything, the goals came from defensive mistakes which really highlighted the gulf in talent between the nations.

“It wasn’t just me. It was my teammates helping me get there. I felt really strong today. I’m glad we could open this tournament with a big bang,” said Rodriguez, who tied the United States record for most goals in a game with five.

After setting up four, Cheney scored one of her own when she completed a cross from O’Reilly to make it 11 in the 64th minute. Rodriguez added her fourth, this time from long range in the 70th minute.

Once again Rodriguez scored in the 75th minute for her fifth of the match. Rodriguez was played in all by herself and the Dominicans were just hoping the final whistle would arrive soon. Unfortunately it wasn’t going to come for another while yet and O’Reilly tapped in a cross from close range to round out the scoring in the 78th minute.

The U.S. amassed a total of 49 shots over the game with 25 on target. Conversely, the Dominican Republic team countered with just a single shot on target.

The one worry for the Americans is the status of Alex Krieger. Krieger took a kick to the outside of her right knee in the first half and looked in a great deal of pain. She was replaced and was later seen on crutches with an ice pack on her knee.

The U.S. staff is saying that is does seem to be a serious knee injury.

 

Post-match video:

[vsw id=”OKbnMkHIQhE” source=”youtube” width=”500″ height=”400″ autoplay=”no”]

6 thoughts on “Memorable Result: USWNT/Dominican Republic Report, Quotes and Video

  1. Scoot

    Look, I play football, and like to compete. I looked up and down the web today, for opinions on the match; the comments written by fans, and the general lack of firm condemnation from bloggers and journalists confirms an opinion of mine:

    Sports has become the largest cornerstone in American culture, and winning at almost any cost is considered the new “classy”. Sportsmanship only seems to be fashionable in concurrence with a win; in other instances it’s an un-necessary entity in competitive matches.

    If only Americans revered education, especially math and science, in the same way as sports, we’d actually be competing with the likes of .

    In my opinion, the (relatively) new attitudes towards sports in America is even filtering down to the youth level.. even some U-10 teams I’ve seen are coached as if the girls are in the military (metaphorically speaking, of course).

    Reply
    1. USEIGHT

      Sure, because when the USWNT won the World Cup hordes of Americans cheered their homecoming only because they were winners, not because they gave a great effort and lost with sportsmanship and grace. Oh…. wait. Wrong place to post about sportsmanship – USWNT and its stars are model pro athletes when it comes to sportsmanship.

      What would you have them do? Stop scoring at 10, then Mexico is not so polite and wins by 12 and then we face Canada in the Semis? That’s not sportsmanlike, that’s just stupid coaching. This isn’t U-10 or High School – this is there job.

      Reply
  2. Phoenix

    I am not American, and I play football (soccer) too. I play in a league where the top teams are way better than the low table ones, so I’ve seen and experienced those double digits scores. But I feel more respect from a team that plays the whole game even if the final score is 14-0 than a team that wins, say 5-0, and stops playing because they pity the other team, or to show “respect”, In that case I feel more insulted than respected. You learn from losses, not from pity.
    But this is just my opinion.

    Reply
  3. Diane

    I would follow Pia anywhere. How can you not admire and respect a coach that has so much love & respect for the game and its players. It is a game, a competition, with rules and defined goals to win. At this level there is no place for pity, as an athlete I would not want pity. DR competed to get a chance to play against the best, hopefully they and their federation learned what it will take for them to take the next step in their program. I am proud of the team and the staff for they way they conduct themselves.

    Reply
  4. Greg

    I would just like to add that all the talk about a lack of sportsmanship ignores the fact that the DR fully expected to go into this game and get dominated; there was no point in the lead up to this match where they found themselves deluded about their chances of even keeping it close, so we should give them a little more credit than to be righteously indignant on their behalf. To imply that they were any more discouraged by a 14-0 loss than they would have been by a 7-0 or 10-0 loss is curious. Changing the scoreline would not have made the disparity in possession, shots, passing percentage, etc any easier to stomach. The DR is there this year simply to experience a higher level of soccer than they are currently capable of playing, with the hopes that it will inspire their team and their federation to improve the quality of their program so that one day they can compete.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *